A Little Summer Reading| Why Does Europe Have Better Books Than We Do?

Hey friends! I’m taking a small break from compiling Europe pictures (I have them on four different devices, so it’s a little challenging to get them all into one post) to do my first book post!

Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m a huge fan of libraries and borrowing books instead of buying them, but I couldn’t help myself . . . I came home from Europe with seven new books in my suitcase.

Hold on, hold on – one is a gift for a friend.

So it’s actually more like six. And in my defense, European bookstores are so much more interesting than American ones. You can tell they took time to carefully select their merchandise, instead of mass-ordering popular books to stock their shelves. *cough cough* Barnes & Noble *cough cough*

And then I came home and bought a couple more at a used bookstore. I haven’t read all of them yet, but I will show them to you and review the ones I did read.

(None of these are my images)

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Again, but Better

I read this one as an ebook while I was in Paris and it’s definitely something that you could start a fandom about (on second thought, there probably already is one). This book was perfect for my trip, as it’s about a girl who goes to London for a study abroad. The story was a little cringey in the beginning, I’m not going to lie, but it got better in the middle. Christine Riccio, the author, published this as her first novel . . . and it was something I could tell just by reading the first few chapters. The story overall is very cute, and has time travel for those interested 🙂 9/10 would recommend, ages 13+.

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The Way I Used to Be

I read this on my ereader as well in just one day. The story, though fairly dark and depressing, drew me in and I could not put it down. Because the story involves sexual violence, however, I would not recommend it to someone under the age of 15 or sensitive readers. It is sooooo good, though, and a very emotion-producing read. 8/10 would recommend.

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Hope and Other Punch Lines

I read this book while I was in England after purchasing it in France. The book centers around the event that occured on 9/11, and two teenagers who were heavily impacted by it. The synopsis on the back cover really grabbed me, but once I started reading the book, I noticed that the story was a little slow. The characters were adorable, though, and I ship them 100%. *squeals excitedly* 8/10 would recommend, ages 12+.

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The Third Twin

The Third Twin is advertised as a thriller, as you can tell by the front cover, but it was definitely NOT. In fact, the whole plotline seemed basic and boring, an average story about twin sisters who get into all sorts of trouble . . . however, the plot twist at the end was exciting. 5/10 would recommend, ages 14+.

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The Names they Gave Us

I bought this at the bookstore Shakespeare + Company in Paris solely for the gorgeous cover. I’m in the middle of it right now, and it seems to be a great story so far. The main character is a pastor’s daughter whose mother is fighting breast cancer. I may do a bigger review on this once I’m finished, we’ll see. Can’t give a recommendation or age rating yet, though.

 

Other books I purchased that I have yet to read.

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Lastly, we come to Chain Letter – I started reading this book but couldn’t get past the first couple of chapters. The book seems so dated, like it was set in the 70s, but was written about seven or eight years ago and is set in modern time. That kind of threw me off. Don’t let the cover fool you, either – the book is not as exciting as it looks. Would not recommend this.

That’s all for now . . I hope you enjoyed this summer reading review.

Have you guys read any of these books? Let me know what you thought in the comments below!

XOXO,

Morgan